Reading Comprehension For SSC CGL CHSL and Bank Exams

Reading Comprehension For SSC CGL CHSL and Bank Exams

Passage - 1

Read the following passage and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

As I stepped out of the train I felt unusually solitary since I was the only passenger to alight. I was accustomed to arriving in the summer, when holidaymakers throng coastal resorts and this was my first visit when the season was over. My destination was a little village which was eight miles by road. It took only a few minutes for me to come to the foot of the cliff path. When I reached the top I had left all signs of habitation behind me. I was surprised to notice that the sky was already a flame with the sunset. It seemed to be getting dark amazingly quickly. I was at a loss to account for the exceptionally early end of daylight since I did not think I had walked unduly slowly. Then I recollected that on previous visits I had walked in high summer and how it was October. All at once it was night. The track was grassy and even in daylight showed up hardly at all.

I was terrified of hurtling over the edge of the cliff to the rocks below. I felt my feet squelching and sticking in something soggy. Then I bumped into a little clump of trees that loomed up in front of me. I climbed up the nearest trunk and managed to find a tolerably comfortable fork to sit on. The waiting was spent by my attempts to identify the little stirrings and noises of animal life that I could hear. I grew colder and colder and managed to sleep only in uneasy fitful starts. At last when the moon came up I was on my way again.

1. The writer felt unusually solitary because

(a) he was feeling very lonely without his family.

(b) he was missing the company of other holidaymakers.

(c) his destination was a little village eight miles away.

(d) there was no one to meet him.

Answer : (b) he was missing the company of other holidaymakers.

2."I left all signs of habitation behind me." This means that he

(a) came to a place where there were very few houses.

(b) was in front of a large collection of cottages.

(c) had come very far from places where people lived.

(d) had just passed a remote village.

Answer : (c) had come very far from places where people lived. 

3. I became darker than the writer expected because

(a) the nights are shorter in autumn than in summer.

(b) the nights are longer in October than mid summer.

(c) the train arrived later than usual.

(d) he had walked unduly slowly.

Answer : (c) the train arrived later than usual.

4. The writer found it difficult to keep to the path because of

(a) the darkness and narrowness of the path.

(b) poor visibility and grassy track.

(c) the darkness and his slow pace.

(d) poor visibility and dew on grass.

(d) poor visibility and dew on grass.

Answer : (d) poor visibility and dew on grass. 

5. When he settled himself on the fork of the tree the writer ___________

(a) had a sound sleep.

(b) was disturbed by noises of animals.

(c) was too afraid to sleep.

(d) tried to sleep but without much success.

Answer : (d) tried to sleep but without much success.

Passage-2

Read the following passage and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

We have inherited the tradition of secrecy about the budget from Britain where also the system has been strongly attacked by eminent economists and political scientists including Peter Jay. Sir Richard Clarke, who was the originating genius of nearly every important development in the British budgeting techniques during the last two decades, has spoken out about the abuse of budget secrecy: “The problems of long-term tax policy should surely be debated openly with the facts on the table. In my opinion, all governments should have just the same duty to publish their expenditure policy. Indeed, this obligation to publish taxation policy is really essential for the control of public expenditure in order to get realistic taxation implications.” Realising that democracy flourishes best on the principles of open government, more and more democracies are having an open public debate on budget proposals before introducing the appropriate Bill in the legislature. In the United States the budget is conveyed in a message by the President to the Congress, which comes well in advance of the date when the Bill is introduced in the Congress. In Finland the Parliament and the people are already discussing in June the tentative budget proposals which are to be introduced in the Finnish Parliament in September.

Every budget contains a cartload of figures in black and white - but the dark figures represent the myriad lights and shades of India’s life, the contrasting tones of poverty and wealth, and of bread so dear and flesh and blood so cheap, the deep tints of adventure and enterprise and man’s ageless struggle for a brighter morning. The Union budget should not be an annual scourge but a part of presentation of annual accounts of a partnership between the Government and the people. That partnership would work much better when the nonsensical secrecy is replaced by openness and public consultations, resulting in fair laws and the people’s acceptance of their moral duty to pay.

1. How do the British economists and political scientists react to budget secrecy? They are

(a) in favour of having a mix of secrecy and openness.

(b) indifferent to the budgeting techniques and taxation policies.

(c) very critical about maintenance of budget secrecy.

(d) advocates of not disclosing in advance the budget contents.

(e) None of these

Answer : (c) very critical about maintenance of budget secrecy.

2. The author thinks that openness in budget is essential as it leads to

(a) prevention of tax implications

(b) people’s reluctance to accept their moral duties

(c) exaggerated revelation of the strengths and weaknesses of economy

(d) making our country on par with Finland

(e) None of these

Answer : (d) making our country on par with Finland

3. The author seems to be in favour of

(a) maintaining secrecy of budget

(b) judicious blend of secrecy and openness

(c) transparency in budget proposals

(d) replacement of public constitution by secrecy

(e) None of these

Answer : (b) judicious blend of secrecy and openness

4. The secrecy of the budget is maintained by all of the following countries except

A. Finland

B. India

C. United States

Options :

(a) Only A (b) Only B (c) Only C (d) A and C (e) B and C

Answer : (d) A and C 

5. Which of the following statements is definitely TRUE in the context of the passage?

(a) The British Government has been religiously maintaining budget secrecy.

(b) Budget secrecy is likely to lead to corrupt practices.

(c) Consulting unjustifiable taxes with public helps make them accept those taxes.

(d) There should be no control on public expenditure in democratic condition.

(e) None of these

Answer : (e) None of these

6. Sir Richard Clarke seems to deserve the credit for

(a) transformation in the British budgetary techniques.

(b) maintenance of secrecy of the British budget.

(c) detection of abuse of transparency in budget.

(d) bringing down the tax load on British people.

(e) None of these

Answer : (e) None of these

7. From the contents of the passage, it can be inferred that the author is

(a) authoritarian in his approach.

(b) a democratic person.

(c) unaware of India’s recent economic developments.

(d) a conservative person.

(e) None of these

Answer : (d) a conservative person.

8. For making the budget realistic, the Government should

(a) refrain from making public the proposed provisions before finalization.

(b) discuss it secretly within themselves.

(c) encourage the public to send in their suggestions.

(d) consult the public, defend their own plans and accept public suggestions.

(e) None of these

Answer : (d) consult the public, defend their own plans and accept public suggestions. 

DIRECTIONS (Qs. 9-10): Choose the word which is most nearly the SAME in meaning to the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

9. SCOURGE

(a) ritual

(b) presentation

(c) whip

(d) compromise

(e) remedy

Answer : (b) presentation.

10. MYRIAD

(a) adequate

(b) functional

(c) incompatible

(d) abundant

(e) excellent

Answer : (c) incompatible 

DIRECTIONS (Qs. 11-12): Choose the word which is most OPPOSITE in meaning to the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

11. FLOURISHES

(a) disappears

(b) degenerates

(c) vanishes

(d) blooms

(e) opens

Answer : (d) blooms

12. DEBATED

(a) questioned severely

(b) opposed strongly

(c) accepted unconditionally

(d) discussed frankly

(e) implemented forcibly

Answer : (b) opposed strongly 

PASSAGE-3

(Question Nos. 1-5)

Modernity- snobbery, though not exclusive to our age, has come to assume an unprecedented importance. The reasons for this are simple and of a strictly economic character. Thanks to modern machinery. production is outrunning consumption. Organized waste among consumers is the first condition of our industrial prosperity. The sooner a consumer throws away the object he has bought and buys another, the better for the producer. At the same time, the producer must do his bit by producing nothing but the most the perishable articles.

1. The expression 'production is outrunning consumption' means
(A) production is falling short of consumption production consumption
(B) consumption is much more than
(C) production is in excess of
(D) production and consumption are running close to each other

Ans. (C) production is in excess of

2. The best definition of the term Modernity-snobbery' is
(A) paying too much attention to use things of the latest design
(B) giving undue attention to the social position
(C) better status for those who are up-to-date
(D) those who are modern get more respect in the society

Ans. (A) paying too much attention to use things of the latest design

3. According to the author, 'modern machinery' is giving rise to
(A) more waste
(B) industrial prosperity
(C) more markets
(D) variety of the consumers

Ans. (B) industrial prosperity

4. The production of more dispensable articles is necessary because it will
(A) satisfy the immediate needs of the customers
(B) compel the customers to go in for new articles
(C) attract more customers
(D) keep the factories working

Ans. (D) keep the factories working

5. For industrial prosperity. modernity-snobbery' is important because it induces people to
(A) buy only the most expensive articles to maintain social position
(B) help in the production of duplicate articles
(C) buy articles which are perishable
(D) discard old things for new ones

Ans. (D) discard old things for new ones

PASSAGE-4

(Question Nos. 6-10)

Reality television is a genre of television programming which, it is claimed, presents unscripted dramatic or humorous situations. documents, actual events. and features ordinary people rather than professional actors. Although the genre has existed in some form or another since the early years of television. The current explosion of popularity dates from around 2000. Part of reality television's appeal is due to its ability to place ordinary people in extraordinary situations. Reality television also has the potential to turn its participants into national celebrities. in talent and performance programmes such as Pop Idd. though frequently Survivor' and 'Big Brother' participants also reach some degree of celebrity. Some commentators have said that the name "reality television" is an insecure description for several styles of programmes included in the genre. In competition-based programmes such us Survivor and other special-living environment shows like The Real World' the producers design the format of the show and control the day-to-day activities and the environment, creating a completely fabricated world in which the competition is worked out, Producers specifically select the participants, and use carefully designed scenarios, challenges, events and settings to encourage particular behaviour and conflicts

6. The participants in the Reality Shows are
(A) comedians
(B) national celebrities
(C) professional actors
(D) ordinary people

Ans. (D) ordinary people

7. The format of competition based programmes is decided by the
(A) the writer of the script
(B) professional actors
(C) producer
(D) participants

Ans. (C) producer

8. In the first sentence, the writer says,
(A) some people insist on the
(B) he wants to distance himself from the statement
(C) he agrees with the statement
(D) everyone agrees with the statement

Ans. (B) he wants to distance himself from the statement

9. Reality television
(A) has only been popular since 2000
(B) has been popular approximately since 2000
(C) has been popular since the start of television
(D) has been popular since well before 2000

Ans. (B) has been popular approximately since 2000

10. Reality TV appeals to some because it
(A) shows average people in exceptional circumstances
(B) can turn ordinary people into celebrities
(C) shows eligible males dating women
(D) uses exotic locations

Ans. (A) shows average people in exceptional circumstances


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